DSC_0876

Garage Day 7-12: Establishing the Perimeter

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Left to cure over the weekend, the footing forms were ready to come off first thing Monday morning! And with the delivery of the wall form rentals the following morning, it was time to establish the perimeter for Fort Mike.

Progress Timelapse…now in HD! (Day 7 to 12)

I’ve simplified the workflow to just Timelapse Assembler and iMovie. I decided it wasn’t worth losing the image quality for just the timelapse panning, so I’ve skipped that step. You can now see the passing of time from the clock mounted on the post under the deck on the right side.

And now at 1080p!



The majority of shots are taken at 30-second intervals, with the occasional 10-second intervals for the particularly entertaining days. The primary is with the GoPro from the fixed mount on the deck, but I’ve started doing a couple simultaneous timelapses for the different angles with the D7000.

All timelapse components have been initially compiled at 30fps with Timelapse Assembler, then adjusted within iMovie up to 4x the original timelapse speed.

  • Slowest Speed: 10s intervals @ 30fps = 300 x realtime
  • Fastest Speed: 30s intervals @ 30fps x 400% = 3600 x realtime

Snaptie Forming System

Form rental delivery
Form rental delivery

Snapties are threaded through slots in each of the 4×6 sheets of plywood used to form the exterior face of the wall. Once all the rebar, conduit, wiring, plumbing, etc have been placed, the other side of the wall form is positioned and threaded onto the existing snapties. A reinforcing steel tie bar is then threaded through the snapties to hold the forms into place when the concrete is poured.

Once the concrete is dried, the tie bars are hammered downward such that the exposed ends of the snapties are sheered off, allowing the wooden forms to be easily pulled off once all tie bars have been removed

Wall Form Snap-tie System
Snap-tie Forming System

Electrical

All existing overhead lines will instead enter the garage at the southwest corner via service masts, run through the concrete wall to the northwest corner of the foundation, then run underground to the house.

We’re upgrading to a 200A service, so the heavy-duty TECK cable coming out of the top between the two conduit pipes is to supply the house with a dedicated 100A service. The conduit on the left is for a control circuit to switch garage lights from the house. The conduit on the right is for data and phone to the house.

Services lines encased in concrete wall and run underground to house
Services lines encased in concrete wall and run to house underground

Plumbing

At the northwest corner, the plumbing for a toilet and sink have been roughed-in. It would have been much more expensive (and not very efficient) to run hot water from the house, so it’ll just be a cold supply line, as shown by the 1″ poly with the red cap. Even a small water tank seems like overkill, so I’ll likely just install a small on-demand system.

Plumbing Rough-in
Plumbing Rough-in

Miscellaneous Photos

Safety First!
Safety First!
Walls formed and buttoned up
Walls formed and buttoned up
Tundra claiming the high vantage point
Tundra claiming the high vantage point for security reasons
Operator practicing boom navigation under the power lines
Operator practicing boom navigation under the power lines
Filling walls with concrete from boom pump
Filling walls with concrete from boom pump
Vibrating to remove bubbles
Vibrating concrete to remove bubbles
Smoothing wall surface
Smoothing wall surface
Concrete Victory!
Concrete Victory!
Embedded mounting posts for framing
Embedded mounting posts for framing
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